ARCHIVES

  • 2017 Annual Benefit: Celebrating Stoney Lamar and Craft After Dark
  • Windgate Project Grant Lecture and Workshop with Rebecca Manson
  • The Life and Work of Harvey Littleton
  • Windgate Project Grant Lecture and Workshop with Rachel Mauser
  • Object as Poet
  • About Face: Exploring the Graphic Identity of Craft Horizons Magazine, 1941-1979
  • Women in Craft Wikipedia Edit-a-thon
  • Salon Series: Craft and Community
  • Holding the Pieces Workshop with Michael Swaine
  • Matter in Action: Mending on the Streets with Michael Swaine
  • The Art of Repair with Dr. Steven J. Jackson
  • Shaker Tape Chair Weaving Workshop
  • November Repair Café
  • Follow the Money: Understanding Art Production Today with Glenn Adamson and Julia Bryan-Wilson
  • Fix it in 15: Bike Repair Clinics
  • General and Special: Designer Talk with Ole Jensen
  • 2016 Back to the Drawing Board
  • Overshot: A Composition for String Quartet and Electronics Inspired by the Lou Tate Kentucky Coverlet Collection
  • 20th Anniversary Celebration & Benefit
  • Ghetto Craft: A Place Where Poverty and Porcelain Intersect, Artist’s Talk with Roberto Lugo
  • Recycled China: The Residue of Industry, Artist’s Talk with Thomas Schmidt
  • 1st Annual Windgate Fellowship Project Grant Artist Talks
  • Showing/Making: Curator’s Talk with Garth Johnson
  • Spaces of Production | The Mend-Smith Project
  • Broadway Block Party
  • Glassville: WNC’s Contemporary Glass Showcase
  • Spaces of Production | The People’s Cloth Trade Show
  • How Artists Get Noticed: An Editor’s View
  • At Human Scale: Artist Talk by Michael Strand
  • Back to the Drawing Board | Blue Mountain, Mark Reigelman (Brooklyn, NY)
  • Process vs Product: Shifting Values in Art, Craft, and Design
  • ‘Loving After Lifetimes of All This’ Exhibition Tour with curator Danny Orendorff
  • Back to the Drawing Board | In Song Sing On: The Songbook Project, David Wilson (Oakland, CA)
  • Bringing it Home: Loving After Lifetimes of All This in Asheville
  • Back to the Drawing Board | Performance Crafting: Hand in Hand, Tanya Aguiñiga (Los Angeles, CA)
  • From Hair to There: Artist Talk with Sonya Clark
  • Paper Piecing: Printmaking and the Quilts of Gee’s Bend Session 2
  • Go Tell It at the Gallery!
  • Quiltmaking Workshop with Louisiana P. Bendolph
  • Gee’s Bend In Translation: A Symposium
  • Exhibiting Blackness and the Gee’s Bend Effect
  • Paper Piecing: Printmaking and the Quilts of Gee’s Bend Session 1
  • Quiltmaking Workshop with Loretta Bennett
  • From Quilts to Prints: A Roundtable Discussion
  • Gee’s Bend Quilts: The Art of Necessity and the Necessity of Art
  • PBS “Craft in America: SERVICE” Sneak Preview
  • The Revolution is Now
  • 3-D Printing Week
  • REBIRTH – Ceramics 14.0 – Art + Design + Architecture | a lecture by Garth Clark
  • The Materiality of Sound: What Can Craft Learn from the Sound Industry?
  • CTRL+P Opening Reception
  • PechaKucha Night Asheville – Vol 6
  • “Taking Shape: A Curator’s Perspective”, discussion with Cindi Strauss
  • Craft in America Industry: Handmade in the Creative Economy Sneak Preview
  • Moogfest brings Immersive, Improvisatory, Durational Performances to Benchspace
  • Sign Painters
  • Bernard Leach and the Fine Art of Pots
  • Ismini Samanidou, Guest International Artist at the WNC Textile Study Group
  • The Future of Traditional Pottery with Garth Clark
  • History in the Making: Maker’s Co-Authors Janet Koplos and Bruce Metcalf
  • An Evening with Matthew Crawford
  • Up for Discussion with Magdalene Odundo
  • CCCD’s Windgate Fellowship Program: A Case for Funding Professional Development Opportunities for Graduating Seniors
  • Not the Straight and Narrow: Diverse Pathways to Bending Wood
  • Audio Archive
  • 2017 Annual Benefit: Celebrating Stoney Lamar and Craft After Dark

    Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 4:30 - 10 pm | Blue Spiral 1 and The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

    Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

    We’re celebrating renowned woodturner Stoney Lamar’s 20 years of board service with a reception and tour of the Forging Futures exhibition at Blue Spiral 1 gallery, followed by a seated dinner and program at CCCD. Gather with artists, collectors, friends, and sponsors of the arts for a memorable evening of great food, drinks, and live music. All ticket and patron gifts support CCCD’s 2018 programming and exhibitions.

    Event Co-Chairs: Fleur Bresler and Andrew Glasgow

    Learn more and purchase dinner tickets or make a donation in honor of Stoney at: http://www.cccdnow.org/celebratingstoney/ 
    (Admission to Craft After Dark after party from 8-10 pm included with dinner ticket purchase)

    Crash the gala! Following our dinner in honor of artist and board member Stoney Lamar, The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design is throwing a cr-after party. Come together with a community of fellow creatives to celebrate Lamar’s work as a renowned wood sculptor and mentor and support the work of CCCD. Stroll through the current exhibition, Tie Up, Draw Down, enjoy live music and an all-inclusive cocktail and dessert bar.

    Eight artists will lead hands-on activities in the wood arts, including lathe woodturning, a ShopBot demo, milk painting, and more. After learning from the pros, roll up your sleeves and strike a pose with sculpting props in the Massive Booth photo booth. Make a new connection in the social lounge, hosted by Creative Mornings Asheville, a monthly speaker series for the creative community.

    Demonstrating Artists:

    Jacque Allen
    Ellie Richards
    Kim Winkle
    Dustin Farnsworth**
    Mark Gardner
    Brent Skidmore
    Tim Maddox**
    Bill Griffith

    **recipients of the CCCD Windgate Fellowship award, which supports emerging craft artists.

    Learn more and purchase after-party tickets at: http://www.craftafterdark.eventbrite.com
    (afterparty tickets included with dinner tickets at link above)

    Your ticket supports The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design, which works to foster a vibrant contemporary craft community in Asheville and beyond and invites visitors to come together in a shared experience of human ingenuity.



    Windgate Project Grant Lecture and Workshop with Rebecca Manson

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    To celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the Windgate Fellowship Award in 2015, marking $1.5 million awarded to 100 emerging craft artists nationwide, CCCD announced ten $10,000 Project Grants to be awarded to previous Windgate Fellows over a three-year period. Now in the second year, CCCD is hosting the Project Grant recipients in Asheville to present artist talks and workshops for the community.

     The 2016 Windgate Project Grant recipients are:

    Rachel Mauser, 2011 Windgate Fellow, Louisville, KY, Book Arts
    Rebecca Manson, 2011 Windgate Fellow, Bedford Hills, NY, Ceramics
    Dustin Farnsworth, 2010 Windgate Fellow, Madison, WI, Woodworking/Functional Art

    Join 2016 Windgate Project Grant recipient Rebecca Manson for two upcoming events:

    Windgate Project Grant Artist Talk with Rebecca Manson
    Friday, July 14, 2017
    Free and open to the public | Registration requested
    REGISTER HERE
    6:30 PM

    Artist Talk by ceramic artist and 2016 Windgate Fellowship Project Grant recipient Rebecca Manson about the project she completed with CCCD grant funds.

    Motif: Polymer Clay Workshop with Rebecca Manson
    Saturday, July 15, 2017

    $25 per person
    Pre-registration required
    REGISTER HERE

    The workshop will explore how a motif can be invented from observation, and how repetition of a simple form can create something entirely new. Each participant will bring an object that they are interested in, learn how to make and record close observations to translate into a motif in clay. Accumulating a mass of small clay pieces, we will come together as a group to build one piece out of our collection of small parts.

    A limited number of scholarships are available for this program. Please contact info@craftcreativitydesign.org by Friday 7/14, 5 pm to learn more and register for a scholarship ticket.

    About Rebecca Manson:

    2016 Windgate Fellowship Project Grant recipient Rebecca Manson works primarily in porcelain, to address themes of unity and community. Her work ranges in scale from handheld to monumental. Manson graduated from Rhode Island School of Design in 2011 and has been a resident artist at the Zentrum Fur Keramik in Berlin, California State University Long Beach, and Sigma Design Company. Manson received a Windgate Fellowship Award in 2007 and a Windgate Project Grant in 2016. In addition to her art practice, she volunteers as a Puppy Raiser for Guiding Eyes for the Blind. Rebecca Manson was born in New York City in 1989 and currently works out of her studio in Bedford Hills, New York.

    The Windgate Fellowship Project Grant program is administered by The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design and supported by the Windgate Fund at the Community Foundation of Western North Carolina.



    The Life and Work of Harvey Littleton

    Friday, May 5, 2017 - 6:30 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

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    Free and open to the public | Registration requested
    REGISTER HERE

    Acclaimed as the “founding father” of the American Studio Glass movement, artist and educator Harvey Littleton (1922-2013) left an indelible imprint on the international glass community. During his time as professor at the University of Wisconsin at Madison and during workshops he held with glass research scientist Dominick Labino in Toledo, Ohio Littleton formed the foundation of the studio class movement and introduced artists to the use of hot glass as a material for contemporary art.

    Today, John Littleton (son) and Kate Vogel (daughter-in-law) carry this glass legacy forward with their own art practice. Join us Friday, May 5 for an inter-generational conversation about the life and work of Harvey Littleton with Kate Vogel and John Littleton, led by their daughter, Annalisa Littleton.

    About John Littleton and Kate Vogel:

    John Littleton and Kate Vogel’s collaboration began shortly after they met at the University of Wisconsin Madison. Since 1979 they have lived in the vibrant Toe River Arts community that surrounds Penland School of Crafts in the mountains of Western North Carolina. John and Kate’s blown works, are an exploration of soft forms that began in the early years of their partnership. The fabric-like forms are as fanciful and fluid as hot glass. Over time, the soft forms have come to mimic the playful relationship of their collaboration and family life.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941-1979, on view at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design January 20 – May 20, 2017.

    The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941–1979 is curated by The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design’s (CCCD) 2017 Curatorial Fellows Elizabeth Essner, Lily Kane, and Meaghan Roddy and organized by CCCD. The CCCD Curatorial Fellowship is made possible by the John & Robyn Horn Foundation. This exhibition is generously sponsored by Rotasa Foundation with additional support from Gary Ferraro and Lorne Lassiter. All Craft Horizons images and content owned by the American Craft Council and provided courtesy of the ACC Library & Archives. CCCD is supported in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.



    Windgate Project Grant Lecture and Workshop with Rachel Mauser

    April 21 and 22 - | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

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    To celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the Windgate Fellowship Award in 2015, marking $1.5 million awarded to 100 emerging craft artists nationwide, CCCD announced ten $10,000 Project Grants to be awarded to previous Windgate Fellows over a three-year period. Now in the second year, CCCD is hosting the Project Grant recipients in Asheville to present artist talks and workshops for the community.

     The 2016 Windgate Project Grant recipients are:

    Rachel Mauser, 2011 Windgate Fellow, Louisville, KY, Book Arts
    Rebecca Manson, 2011 Windgate Fellow, Bedford Hills, NY, Ceramics
    Dustin Farnsworth, 2010 Windgate Fellow, Madison, WI, Woodworking/Functional Art

    Join 2016 Windgate Project Grant recipient Rachel Mauser for two upcoming events:

    Windgate Project Grant Artist Talk with Rachel Mauser
    Friday, April 21, 2017
    Free and open to the public | Registration requested
    REGISTER HERE
    6:30 PM

    2016 Windgate Project Grant recipient, Rachel Mauser speaks about her new body of work: three new artist books. Her beautifully sculpted books also include original poetry and explore ideas of community, home, belonging and change.

    Speak up! Finding the Right Structure For Your Story
    Workshop with Rachel Mauser
    Saturday, April 22, 2017

    $40 per person
    Pre-registration required
    REGISTER HERE

    Think through issues of racial and cultural identity in this all levels bookmaking workshop. Participants will use 6-word memoirs, critical questioning, and collaborative techniques to explore different ways to share a story. Quick bookbinding structures and paper folding techniques will be taught in order to find the best form to help get a message across. No prior experience necessary, all supplies included.

    About Rachel Mauser:

    Rachel Mauser is a multi-media artist living and working in Louisville, Kentucky. She is co-founder and Program Director for the Steam Exchange, a community arts organization that serves the Smoketown neighborhood of Louisville. She recently completed the Core Fellowship at Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina. She holds a BFA in painting and art education from Murray State University. Rachel was a recipient of the Windgate Fellowship in 2011, which she used to attend workshops at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Penland School of Crafts, and Anderson Ranch Arts Center. Rachel uses a variety of media including letterpress, printmaking, metal, and textiles to create artist books that are both sculptural and conceptual in nature. Her work has been shown at national and international art venues, including Penland School of Crafts, Todd Art Gallery in TN, and Murray Art Guild in KY. Rachel has taught paper making, printmaking, painting, and bookbinding workshops nationally and internationally.

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    For more information about registering for the event and other YWCA Stand Against Racism initiatives, please contact gleonard@ywcaofasheville.org.

    The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design is proud to partner with YWCA’s Stand Against Racism campaign for this program.

    YWCA is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women and promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all. Stand AgainstRacism is a signature campaign of YWCA USA to build community among those who work for racial justice and to raise awareness about the negative impact of institutional and structural racism in our communities. This campaign is one part of our larger national strategy to fulfill our mission of eliminating racism.



    Object as Poet

    April 28, 2017 - 6:30-8 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

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    Free and open to the public | Registration requested
    REGISTER HERE

    Inspired by the writings of longtime Craft Horizons magazine editor Rose Slivka and artist/poet M.C. Richards, The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design (CCCD) posed a challenge for makers and writers: to create a new collaborative work inspired by The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons Magazine, 1941-1979 in just 11 days.

    In response to the call, makers, writers, and poets will join together to create new, experimental works to present at CCCD’s Benchspace Gallery & Workshop. On April 28, join us for a reading and performance by poet and collage artist Sebastian Matthews, and a public revealing of these collaborative experiments.

    Sebastian-Matthews_Credit-Stephanie-Glaros

    About Sebastian Matthews:

    Sebastian Matthews is the author of the memoir In My Father’s Footsteps (W.W. Norton & Co.) and three books of poems, Beginner’s Guide to a Head-on Collision, We Generous and Miracle Day (Red Hen Press). He co-edited, along with Stanley Plumly, Search Party: The Collected Poems of William Matthews (a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize), The Poetry Blues: Essays & Interviews of William Matthews and New Hope for the Dead: Uncollected Matthews. His work has appeared in American Poetry Review, The Atlantic, Georgia Review, Massachusetts Review, Poets & Writers, Story South, Tin House, Virginia Quarterly Review, & The Writer’s Chronicle, among others. He taught for 15 years in Warren Wilson College’s undergraduate creative writing department as well as at Pitzer College (as a visiting writer) and the University of North Carolina at Asheville’s Great Smokies Writing Program. He serves on the board at Vermont Studio Center and on the advisory board for Callaloo: A Journal of African Diaspora Arts & Letters, and as an editor at Q Ave Press, a poetry chapbook collective. Matthews has recently completed Out Walking: Personal Essays (1990-2016), and The Life & Times of American Crow: A Collage Novel in 11 Chapbooks.

    Application deadline extended: We are still looking for a few more presenters! If you are interested in participating as a collaborating artist or writer please complete this form by April 1, 2017.

    For questions about the program or application, please contact ahelgeson@craftcreativitydesign.org or 828-785-1357.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941-1979, on view at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design January 20 – May 20, 2017.

    The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941–1979 is curated by The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design’s (CCCD) 2017 Curatorial Fellows Elizabeth Essner, Lily Kane, and Meaghan Roddy and organized by CCCD. The CCCD Curatorial Fellowship is made possible by the John & Robyn Horn Foundation. This exhibition is generously sponsored by Rotasa Foundation with additional support from Gary Ferraro and Lorne Lassiter. All Craft Horizons images and content owned by the American Craft Council and provided courtesy of the ACC Library & Archives. CCCD is supported in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.



    About Face: Exploring the Graphic Identity of Craft Horizons Magazine, 1941-1979

    April 7, 2017 - 6:30 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

    Sarah Slider

    Free and open to the public, registration requested
    REGISTER HERE

    Join us for a lecture by Philadelphia-based writer and curator Sarah Archer on the iconic graphic designers behind Craft Horizons magazine.

    This talk will trace the rich and complex relationship between craft and graphic design, starting with a brief aesthetic overview of influential Arts and Crafts publication The Craftsman, which debuted in 1901, as well as the proliferation of how-to manuals, magazines, and kits that helped popularize the hobby craft industry during the interwar period. All of this material set the stage for Craft Horizons, which debuted modestly during World War II with a rather spare graphic identity, and, thanks to the vision of its very first in-house art director, Sydney Butchkes would become more colorful, playful, and modern throughout the 1950’s and ’60s. In 1956, the graphic designers Robert Brownjohn and Ivan Chermayeff designed a new logo for Craft Horizons, in the years just prior to their respective work on the opening titles for numerous James Bond movies and the NBC logo. The modern look and feel Craft Horizons in the 1950s and ’60s paralleled trends in the larger advertising and magazine worlds rather than those of the hobby craft industry. Though it advertised many a hobbyist’s toolkit in its back pages, and covered a wide range of craft practices editorially, the magazine was visually coded to appeal to a modern, somewhat avant garde sensibility.

    About Sarah Archer:

    Sarah Archer is a writer and independent curator based in Philadelphia. Prior to moving to Philadelphia to become Senior Curator at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, she was the Director of Greenwich House Pottery. She is a regular contributor to Hyperallergic, and her articles and reviews have appeared in The Journal of Modern Craft, Modern Magazine, Studio Potter, The Huffington Post, Slate, The New Yorker online, and The Washington Post. She has contributed essays to exhibition catalogs for the Portland Art Museum, the Milwaukee Museum of Art, and the Museum of Arts and Design. Her essays have been included in the anthologies Shows and Tales edited by Art Jewelry Forum, and The Ceramics Reader, forthcoming from Bloomsbury Press. She has curated exhibitions at Urban Glass and Pratt Manhattan Gallery. She holds a BA from Swarthmore College, and an MA from the Bard Graduate Center. She has taught at the Westphal College of Media Arts and Design, Drexel University, and the Tyler School of Art, Temple University, and given talks for the American Craft Council and the American Philosophical Society. She is a member of the board of Collab, the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s modern design advocacy group. Her first book, Midcentury Christmas, was published by Countryman Press and W.W. Norton in 2016.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941-1979, on view at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design January 20 – May 20, 2017.

    The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941–1979 is curated by The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design’s (CCCD) 2017 Curatorial Fellows Elizabeth Essner, Lily Kane, and Meaghan Roddy and organized by CCCD. The CCCD Curatorial Fellowship is made possible by the John & Robyn Horn Foundation. This exhibition is generously sponsored by Rotasa Foundation with additional support from Gary Ferraro and Lorne Lassiter. All Craft Horizons images and content owned by the American Craft Council and provided courtesy of the ACC Library & Archives. CCCD is supported in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.



    Women in Craft Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

    Saturday, March 4, 2017 - 2 - 6 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design
    Image: Art+Feminism

    Art+Feminism

    SPACE IS LIMITED — REGISTER HERE

    Celebrate women’s history month by joining CCCD and Art+Feminism to edit Wikipedia articles to include the influential work of women working in craft between 1941-1979. No experience necessary, Wiki experts on hand.

    F.A.Q.’s

    What is a Wiki Edit-a-thon?
    According to Wikipedia, an edit-a thon is a special type of meetup to improve the encyclopedia. It is usually focused on a specific encyclopedia topic, and is a great way to attract new Wikipedians.

    What special topic has The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design (CCCD) selected?
    CCCD is joining Art+Feminism to celebrate women’s history month (March) and our topic is Women in Craft.

    What is Art + Feminism?
    Art+Feminism is an international project improving content on women and the arts on Wikipedia, and encourages women’s participation on the encyclopedia.

    I have never edited anything on Wikipedia before, can I still come?
    Yes, please do! We will have Wiki experts on hand to help with all the technical stuff, if you want to plan ahead and are feeling super ambitious, we recommend watching some of these instructional videos put out by Art+Feminism.

    I don’t know anything about craft or women can I still come?
    Yes, we will have a list of recommended topics and ample books, magazines, and other source materials on hand. There will also be many people at the event who do know a lot about women and craft who will be happy to help.

    Do I need to bring my own computer?
    If you have a laptop please do bring it with you. If you don’t have a laptop don’t let that stop you, we will have a few extras and we encourage people to edit in teams.

    Do I need to bring my own source materials?
    We will provide books and magazines that can be used, however if you have any books, magazines, or newspapers that could be used as valid sources please do bring them with you.

    What can I expect when I get there, will this be fun?
    Yes, this will be fun.  There will be music, smart people, interesting books and magazines, food and beverage – so how could it not be fun?

    Editing makes me hungry and thirsty, what should I do?
    We will provide ample food and drink to keep everyone happy and motivated.

    What if I still have questions?
    Please contact Anna at ahelgeson@craftcreativitydesign.org for more information.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941-1979, on view at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design January 20 – May 20, 2017.

    The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941–1979 is curated by The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design’s (CCCD) 2017 Curatorial Fellows Elizabeth Essner, Lily Kane, and Meaghan Roddy and organized by CCCD. The CCCD Curatorial Fellowship is made possible by the John & Robyn Horn Foundation. This exhibition is generously sponsored by Rotasa Foundation with additional support from Gary Ferraro and Lorne Lassiter. All Craft Horizons images and content owned by the American Craft Council and provided courtesy of the ACC Library & Archives. CCCD is supported in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.



    Salon Series: Craft and Community

    Saturday, February 18, 2017 - 4 - 6 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design
    Image: University of Chicago Press

    Image: University of Chicago Press

    SPACE IS LIMITED — REGISTER HERE

    Following in the tradition of literary and philosophical salons of the 17th and 18th century CCCD will host gatherings in conjunction with each exhibition at Benchspace Gallery & Workshop to engage with a central theme of the show. A book will be selected based on the theme and provide a framework for discussion. Refreshments will be served, all are welcome.

    The Good Making of Good Things Salon Theme is Craft and Community

    Our discussion will center around themes of the exhibition and book, Live Form: Women, Ceramics, and Community by Jenni Sorkin. Refreshments will be served. No reading necessary prior to the event.

    About the book: Ceramics had a far-reaching impact in the second half of the twentieth century, as its artists worked through the same ideas regarding abstraction and form as those for other creative mediums. Live Form shines new light on the relation of ceramics to the artistic avant-garde by looking at the central role of women in the field: potters who popularized ceramics as they worked with or taught male counterparts like John Cage, Peter Voulkos, and Ken Price.

    Salon members shop local and pre-order your copy through Malaprops, Asheville’s independently owned and operated bookstore. Mention CCCDSALON in the order comments to get 10% off the cover price.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941-1979, on view at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design January 20 – May 20, 2017.

    The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941–1979 is curated by The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design’s (CCCD) 2017 Curatorial Fellows Elizabeth Essner, Lily Kane, and Meaghan Roddy and organized by CCCD. The CCCD Curatorial Fellowship is made possible by the John & Robyn Horn Foundation. This exhibition is generously sponsored by Rotasa Foundation with additional support from Gary Ferraro and Lorne Lassiter. All Craft Horizons images and content owned by the American Craft Council and provided courtesy of the ACC Library & Archives. CCCD is supported in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.



    Holding the Pieces Workshop with Michael Swaine

    December 3, 2016 - 10:00 am - 12:00 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

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    “Repair is often out of necessity. Something falls apart and we put it back together. We as a group will pause in this stage where things have fallen apart. Bring something that is broken. It can be something that just fell apart, or something that you took apart but now can’t seem to put back together, in several pieces. Something that had a long life or you just bought it.  Bring the pieces. We will start by holding what is not together. We will each tell the story of the parts. Our pieces together will lead to a new possible future. ”

    Join Michael Swaine at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design, with a broken object in tow, to experience a new kind of fixing.

    Sliding scale registration. Suggested donation $15.

    Register at holdingthepieces.eventbrite.com

    About Michael Swaine: 

    Michael Swaine was originally trained as a ceramicist, but he works in a variety of materials, methods, and media and has had a long-time focus on collaborative work – in particular with Futurefarmers. He has participated in exhibitions at teh Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California; SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico; The Guggenheim, New York among others. His Free Mending Library received notice on CBS Nightly News in May 2015, winning him a Jefferson Award for Public Service in San Francisco two months later. Swaine holds a BFA from Alfred University and an MA from the College of Environmnetal Design at the University of California, Berkeley. Swaine began teaching at the University of Washington in 2015.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Future of Fixing, on view at Benchspace Gallery & Workshop September 2, 2016 – January 7, 2017.

    The Future of Fixing was originally created by From-Now-On and adapted and curated by Marilyn Zapf of The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. This project was supported by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

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    Matter in Action: Mending on the Streets with Michael Swaine

    December 1, 2016 - 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

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    Join artist Michael Swaine as he details the 15 years he spent offering ‘free mending’ in the heart San Francisco’s Tenderloin district.

    He says, there are “ten things I learned about mending, that at first glance have nothing to do with mending and, with later pondering, have everything to do with mending.”

    This event is free and open to the public. $3-5 suggested donation. Event registration required.

    Register at matterinaction.eventbrite.com

    About Michael Swaine: 

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    Michael Swaine was originally trained as a ceramicist, but he works in a variety of materials, methods, and media and has had a long-time focus on collaborative work – in particular with Futurefarmers. He has participated in exhibitions at teh Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California; SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico; The Guggenheim, New York among others. His Free Mending Library received notice on CBS Nightly News in May 2015, winning him a Jefferson Award for Public Service in San Francisco two months later. Swaine holds a BFA from Alfred University and an MA from the College of Environmnetal Design at the University of California, Berkeley. Swaine began teaching at the University of Washington in 2015.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Future of Fixing, on view at Benchspace Gallery & Workshop September 2, 2016 – January 7, 2017.

    The Future of Fixing was originally created by From-Now-On and adapted and curated by Marilyn Zapf of The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. This project was supported by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

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    RECENT NEWS

    The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design launches “Craft City”

    The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design (CCCD) debuts a new program series this summer that honors Asheville as “Craft City.” At three outdoor pop-up studios this summer (July 7, August 4, and September 1) people of all skill levels and backgrounds can make a take-home craft under the guidance of a visiting artist.

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    VISIT: The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design | 67 Broadway Street, Asheville, NC 28801 | map it | Phone: 828.785.1357 Fax: 828.785.1372 | email us | Gallery hours: Tue - Sat 10-6