ARCHIVES

  • Women in Craft Wikipedia Edit-a-thon
  • Salon Series: Craft and Community
  • Holding the Pieces Workshop with Michael Swaine
  • Matter in Action: Mending on the Streets with Michael Swaine
  • The Art of Repair with Dr. Steven J. Jackson
  • Shaker Tape Chair Weaving Workshop
  • November Repair Café
  • Follow the Money: Understanding Art Production Today with Glenn Adamson and Julia Bryan-Wilson
  • Fix it in 15: Bike Repair Clinics
  • General and Special: Designer Talk with Ole Jensen
  • 2016 Back to the Drawing Board
  • Overshot: A Composition for String Quartet and Electronics Inspired by the Lou Tate Kentucky Coverlet Collection
  • 20th Anniversary Celebration & Benefit
  • Ghetto Craft: A Place Where Poverty and Porcelain Intersect, Artist’s Talk with Roberto Lugo
  • Recycled China: The Residue of Industry, Artist’s Talk with Thomas Schmidt
  • 1st Annual Windgate Fellowship Project Grant Artist Talks
  • Showing/Making: Curator’s Talk with Garth Johnson
  • Spaces of Production | The Mend-Smith Project
  • Broadway Block Party
  • Glassville: WNC’s Contemporary Glass Showcase
  • Spaces of Production | The People’s Cloth Trade Show
  • How Artists Get Noticed: An Editor’s View
  • At Human Scale: Artist Talk by Michael Strand
  • Back to the Drawing Board | Blue Mountain, Mark Reigelman (Brooklyn, NY)
  • Process vs Product: Shifting Values in Art, Craft, and Design
  • ‘Loving After Lifetimes of All This’ Exhibition Tour with curator Danny Orendorff
  • Back to the Drawing Board | In Song Sing On: The Songbook Project, David Wilson (Oakland, CA)
  • Bringing it Home: Loving After Lifetimes of All This in Asheville
  • Back to the Drawing Board | Performance Crafting: Hand in Hand, Tanya Aguiñiga (Los Angeles, CA)
  • From Hair to There: Artist Talk with Sonya Clark
  • Paper Piecing: Printmaking and the Quilts of Gee’s Bend Session 2
  • Go Tell It at the Gallery!
  • Quiltmaking Workshop with Louisiana P. Bendolph
  • Gee’s Bend In Translation: A Symposium
  • Exhibiting Blackness and the Gee’s Bend Effect
  • Paper Piecing: Printmaking and the Quilts of Gee’s Bend Session 1
  • Quiltmaking Workshop with Loretta Bennett
  • From Quilts to Prints: A Roundtable Discussion
  • Gee’s Bend Quilts: The Art of Necessity and the Necessity of Art
  • PBS “Craft in America: SERVICE” Sneak Preview
  • The Revolution is Now
  • 3-D Printing Week
  • REBIRTH – Ceramics 14.0 – Art + Design + Architecture | a lecture by Garth Clark
  • The Materiality of Sound: What Can Craft Learn from the Sound Industry?
  • CTRL+P Opening Reception
  • PechaKucha Night Asheville – Vol 6
  • “Taking Shape: A Curator’s Perspective”, discussion with Cindi Strauss
  • Craft in America Industry: Handmade in the Creative Economy Sneak Preview
  • Moogfest brings Immersive, Improvisatory, Durational Performances to Benchspace
  • Sign Painters
  • Bernard Leach and the Fine Art of Pots
  • Ismini Samanidou, Guest International Artist at the WNC Textile Study Group
  • The Future of Traditional Pottery with Garth Clark
  • History in the Making: Maker’s Co-Authors Janet Koplos and Bruce Metcalf
  • An Evening with Matthew Crawford
  • Up for Discussion with Magdalene Odundo
  • CCCD’s Windgate Fellowship Program: A Case for Funding Professional Development Opportunities for Graduating Seniors
  • Not the Straight and Narrow: Diverse Pathways to Bending Wood
  • Where is Tradition in American Studio Craft?
  • Women in Craft Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

    Saturday, March 4, 2017 - 2 - 6 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design
    Image: Art+Feminism

    Art+Feminism

    SPACE IS LIMITED — REGISTER HERE

    Celebrate women’s history month by joining CCCD and Art+Feminism to edit Wikipedia articles to include the influential work of women working in craft between 1941-1979. No experience necessary, Wiki experts on hand.

    F.A.Q.’s

    What is a Wiki Edit-a-thon?
    According to Wikipedia, an edit-a thon is a special type of meetup to improve the encyclopedia. It is usually focused on a specific encyclopedia topic, and is a great way to attract new Wikipedians.

    What special topic has The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design (CCCD) selected?
    CCCD is joining Art+Feminism to celebrate women’s history month (March) and our topic is Women in Craft.

    What is Art + Feminism?
    Art+Feminism is an international project improving content on women and the arts on Wikipedia, and encourages women’s participation on the encyclopedia.

    I have never edited anything on Wikipedia before, can I still come?
    Yes, please do! We will have Wiki experts on hand to help with all the technical stuff, if you want to plan ahead and are feeling super ambitious, we recommend watching some of these instructional videos put out by Art+Feminism.

    I don’t know anything about craft or women can I still come?
    Yes, we will have a list of recommended topics and ample books, magazines, and other source materials on hand. There will also be many people at the event who do know a lot about women and craft who will be happy to help.

    Do I need to bring my own computer?
    If you have a laptop please do bring it with you. If you don’t have a laptop don’t let that stop you, we will have a few extras and we encourage people to edit in teams.

    Do I need to bring my own source materials?
    We will provide books and magazines that can be used, however if you have any books, magazines, or newspapers that could be used as valid sources please do bring them with you.

    What can I expect when I get there, will this be fun?
    Yes, this will be fun.  There will be music, smart people, interesting books and magazines, food and beverage – so how could it not be fun?

    Editing makes me hungry and thirsty, what should I do?
    We will provide ample food and drink to keep everyone happy and motivated.

    What if I still have questions?
    Please contact Anna at ahelgeson@craftcreativitydesign.org for more information.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941-1979, on view at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design January 20 – May 20, 2017.

    The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941–1979 is curated by The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design’s (CCCD) 2017 Curatorial Fellows Elizabeth Essner, Lily Kane, and Meaghan Roddy and organized by CCCD. The CCCD Curatorial Fellowship is made possible by the John & Robyn Horn Foundation. This exhibition is generously sponsored by Rotasa Foundation with additional support from Gary Ferraro and Lorne Lassiter. All Craft Horizons images and content owned by the American Craft Council and provided courtesy of the ACC Library & Archives. CCCD is supported in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.



    Salon Series: Craft and Community

    Saturday, February 18, 2017 - 4 - 6 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design
    Image: University of Chicago Press

    Image: University of Chicago Press

    SPACE IS LIMITED — REGISTER HERE

    Following in the tradition of literary and philosophical salons of the 17th and 18th century CCCD will host gatherings in conjunction with each exhibition at Benchspace Gallery & Workshop to engage with a central theme of the show. A book will be selected based on the theme and provide a framework for discussion. Refreshments will be served, all are welcome.

    The Good Making of Good Things Salon Theme is Craft and Community

    Our discussion will center around themes of the exhibition and book, Live Form: Women, Ceramics, and Community by Jenni Sorkin. Refreshments will be served. No reading necessary prior to the event.

    About the book: Ceramics had a far-reaching impact in the second half of the twentieth century, as its artists worked through the same ideas regarding abstraction and form as those for other creative mediums. Live Form shines new light on the relation of ceramics to the artistic avant-garde by looking at the central role of women in the field: potters who popularized ceramics as they worked with or taught male counterparts like John Cage, Peter Voulkos, and Ken Price.

    Salon members shop local and pre-order your copy through Malaprops, Asheville’s independently owned and operated bookstore. Mention CCCDSALON in the order comments to get 10% off the cover price.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941-1979, on view at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design January 20 – May 20, 2017.

    The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons 1941–1979 is curated by The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design’s (CCCD) 2017 Curatorial Fellows Elizabeth Essner, Lily Kane, and Meaghan Roddy and organized by CCCD. The CCCD Curatorial Fellowship is made possible by the John & Robyn Horn Foundation. This exhibition is generously sponsored by Rotasa Foundation with additional support from Gary Ferraro and Lorne Lassiter. All Craft Horizons images and content owned by the American Craft Council and provided courtesy of the ACC Library & Archives. CCCD is supported in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.



    Holding the Pieces Workshop with Michael Swaine

    December 3, 2016 - 10:00 am - 12:00 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

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    “Repair is often out of necessity. Something falls apart and we put it back together. We as a group will pause in this stage where things have fallen apart. Bring something that is broken. It can be something that just fell apart, or something that you took apart but now can’t seem to put back together, in several pieces. Something that had a long life or you just bought it.  Bring the pieces. We will start by holding what is not together. We will each tell the story of the parts. Our pieces together will lead to a new possible future. ”

    Join Michael Swaine at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design, with a broken object in tow, to experience a new kind of fixing.

    Sliding scale registration. Suggested donation $15.

    Register at holdingthepieces.eventbrite.com

    About Michael Swaine: 

    Michael Swaine was originally trained as a ceramicist, but he works in a variety of materials, methods, and media and has had a long-time focus on collaborative work – in particular with Futurefarmers. He has participated in exhibitions at teh Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California; SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico; The Guggenheim, New York among others. His Free Mending Library received notice on CBS Nightly News in May 2015, winning him a Jefferson Award for Public Service in San Francisco two months later. Swaine holds a BFA from Alfred University and an MA from the College of Environmnetal Design at the University of California, Berkeley. Swaine began teaching at the University of Washington in 2015.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Future of Fixing, on view at Benchspace Gallery & Workshop September 2, 2016 – January 7, 2017.

    The Future of Fixing was originally created by From-Now-On and adapted and curated by Marilyn Zapf of The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. This project was supported by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

    NCAC



    Matter in Action: Mending on the Streets with Michael Swaine

    December 1, 2016 - 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

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    Join artist Michael Swaine as he details the 15 years he spent offering ‘free mending’ in the heart San Francisco’s Tenderloin district.

    He says, there are “ten things I learned about mending, that at first glance have nothing to do with mending and, with later pondering, have everything to do with mending.”

    This event is free and open to the public. $3-5 suggested donation. Event registration required.

    Register at matterinaction.eventbrite.com

    About Michael Swaine: 

    swaineheadshot

    Michael Swaine was originally trained as a ceramicist, but he works in a variety of materials, methods, and media and has had a long-time focus on collaborative work – in particular with Futurefarmers. He has participated in exhibitions at teh Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California; SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico; The Guggenheim, New York among others. His Free Mending Library received notice on CBS Nightly News in May 2015, winning him a Jefferson Award for Public Service in San Francisco two months later. Swaine holds a BFA from Alfred University and an MA from the College of Environmnetal Design at the University of California, Berkeley. Swaine began teaching at the University of Washington in 2015.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Future of Fixing, on view at Benchspace Gallery & Workshop September 2, 2016 – January 7, 2017.

    The Future of Fixing was originally created by From-Now-On and adapted and curated by Marilyn Zapf of The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. This project was supported by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

    NCAC

     

     



    The Art of Repair with Dr. Steven J. Jackson

    November 14, 2016 - 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

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    What does it mean to fix things?  And how might starting from repair, instead of design, innovation, invention, etc. – change how we think about technology, art, and creative human action in the world?

    This talk will draw on recent and older work in philosophy, sociology and technology studies to make the case for repair as a crucial but widely misunderstood (and undervalued) dimension in our relationships with the non-human world.  It will also report on a wide-ranging program of ethnographic research with fixing communities from around the country and around the world – from mobile phone repair workers in Namibia and Bangladesh, to amateur repair movements in Europe and the U.S., to new media artists and robotic surgeons in New York City.  It will explore what makes repair work hard and often invisible, and the social, cultural, and environmental promises of a more repair-friendly world.

    This event is free and open to the public. Suggested donation $3-5. Event registration required.

    Register at artofrepair.eventbrite.com

    About Dr. Steven J. Jackson

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    Dr. Steven J. Jackson is a professor and researcher in the Cornell University Department of Information Science.  He teaches and conducts research in the areas of human-computer interaction, technology policy, and global development, with special interest in problems of time, maintenance and repair, and the nature and range of human-object relations (as expressed with and through technology).  His academic work has included field studies with groups seeking to deploy new computational infrastructures in fields ranging from physics to fine art furniture production; how new social computing practices may violate and remake existing cultural norms around privacy, ownership, and creativity; and how emerging infrastructures may complicate our basic cultural practices around the production, sharing, and contestation of knowledge.  Above all however he cares about technology in its human dimensions, and argues that the value and interest of technology (if any) lies ultimately in its capacity to extend, augment, and realize core human relationships and possibilities (love, sorrow, care, etc.) with and through the material worlds around us.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Future of Fixing, on view at Benchspace Gallery & Workshop September 2, 2016 – January 7, 2017.

    The Future of Fixing was originally created by From-Now-On and adapted and curated by Marilyn Zapf of The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. This project was supported by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

    NCAC



    Shaker Tape Chair Weaving Workshop

    November 5, 2016 - 10:00 am - 4:00 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

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    Join Brandy Clements, a 4th generation chair caner, and Dave Klingler of Silver River Center for Chair Caning, the nation’s only chair caning school and museum, to learn how to fix a chair seat with Shaker tape on chairs rescued from the Masonic Lodge in West Asheville.

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    The stencils (OES 191 AFAM 665) on the chair backs refer to an extant local freemasonic group called the Order of the Eastern Star, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, which included both men & women and all religions. Chairs have been spruced up and are ready for a new seat and another half-century of use! Students can choose from a variety of colors of Shaker Tape to weave in either a herringbone or checkerboard pattern. Wear comfortable clothes and shoes. Call instructors at 828-707-4553 with any questions prior to the event or visit www.SilverRiverChairs.com/workshops to read FAQ’s.

    Register at: shakertapeworkshop.eventbrite.com

    $125 + $65 materials fee/person. The materials fee includes chair and tape. Lunch is not included.

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    This event is held in conjunction with The Future of Fixing, on view at Benchspace Gallery & Workshop September 2, 2016 – January 7, 2017.

    The Future of Fixing was originally created by From-Now-On and adapted and curated by Marilyn Zapf of The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. This project was supported by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

    NCAC



    November Repair Café

    November 4, 2016 - 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

    Bring your broken electronics and small appliances to Benchspace Gallery & Workshop and learn how to fix them with Asheville Makers!

    Event is free and open to the public. Event registration is recommended, drop-ins welcome.

    Register today at: novrepaircafe.eventbrite.com

    A repair cafe is an event where participants can bring their broken electronics and small appliances, and engage in the process of fixing them. We will provide tools, materials, and most importantly knowledgeable volunteers, available to assist in the repair effort. No former fix-it experience is necessary. All are welcome to participate; volunteers to help are also welcome.

    For more information feel free to contact theashevillemakers@gmail.com

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    This event is held in conjunction with The Future of Fixing, on view at Benchspace Gallery & Workshop September 2, 2016 – January 7, 2017.

    The Future of Fixing was originally created by From-Now-On and adapted and curated by Marilyn Zapf of The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. This project was supported by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

    NCAC



    Follow the Money: Understanding Art Production Today with Glenn Adamson and Julia Bryan-Wilson

    October 27, 2016 - 6:30 pm | 8:00 pm

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    CCCD is pleased to announce the second annual Windgate Research and Collections Curator Lecture, titled “Follow the Money: Understanding Art Production Today”, with Glenn Adamson and Julia Bryan-Wilson.

    In their new book, Art in the Making: Artists and their Materials from the Studio to Crowdsourcing, Julia Bryan-Wilson and Glenn Adamson make a series of provocative arguments about contemporary art practice. Noting the longstanding aversion of artists and their representatives to transparent discussion of production, they argue for the importance of process in critical interpretation.

    In this talk, they will highlight one of the most important, yet least discussed aspects in the making of contemporary art: its economic footprint. They will examine issues such as the use of luxury materials, dependence on fabricators, and the significance of scale. Among the artists under discussion will be Susan Collis, Urs Fischer, Sylvie Fleury, Damian Hirst, Jeff Koons, Jill Magid, Ai Weiwei, and Rachel Whiteread.

    A reception will follow the talk at 7:30 pm, including a book signing by Malaprop’s.

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    The event is free and open to the public. $3-5 suggested donation. Event registration is required.

    Register at followthemoneylecture.eventbrite.com

    About the authors:

    Glenn Adamson is a curator and theorist who works across the fields of design, craft and contemporary art. He was until March 2016 the Director of the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), New York. He has previously been Head of Research at the V&A, and Curator at the Chipstone Foundation in Milwaukee. His publications include Art in the Making (2016, co-authored with Julia Bryan Wilson); Invention of Craft (2013); Postmodernism: Style and Subversion (2011); The Craft Reader (2010); and Thinking Through Craft (2007).

    Julia Bryan-Wilson is associate professor of contemporary art at the University of California, Berkeley and a frequent contributor to Artforum. She is the author Art Workers: Radical Practice in the Vietnam War Era (2009), and, with Glenn Adamson, Art in the Making: Artists and their Materials from the Studio to Crowdsourcing (2016). Her book Fray: Art and Textile Politics will be published in 2017 by the University of Chicago Press.

    About the book:

    Art in the Making: Artists and their Materials from the Studio to Crowdsourcing (Thames and Hudson, 2016)

    In this wide-ranging exploration of methods and media in art since the 1950s Glenn Adamson and Julia Bryan-Wilson take the reader behind the scenes of the studio, the factory, and other sites where art is created. They show how the materials and processes used by artists are vital to considerations of authorship, and to understanding the economic and social contexts from which art emerges.

    About the Windgate Research and Collections Curator:

    The Windgate Research and Collections Curator is a jointly appointed position demonstrating a significant partnership between CCCD, the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), and the Bard Graduate Center (BGC) in New York City. This position serves to establish a new hub for expanded field of craft research in the United States. Funded by the Windgate Charitable Foundation, the post is intended to advance scholarly research and critical discourse in the fields of craft and design through research, exhibitions, publications, and public programming.

    Elissa Auther was appointed Windgate Research and Collections Curator in 2015, at MAD, BGC, and CCCD. At MAD she has recently launched an initiative to reactivate the museum’s permanent collection with a series of creative exhibitions that connect the history of craft to contemporary artistic practice today. At BGC, she teaches graduate seminars in contemporary art and the history of craft. In addition to serving on CCCD’s Program Advisory Council, Auther organizes an annual lecture series in Asheville, NC.



    Fix it in 15: Bike Repair Clinics

    October 22, 2016 - 1:00 - 3:00 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

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    Join CCCD and Asheville on Bikes for a series of 15-minute bike repair clinics in our outdoor garage. Bring your bike, learn new skills. No experience necessary. Sign-ups will be on a first-come basis at the door.

    The three workshops that will run during the Fix it in 15 event all taught by avid cyclists and Asheville on Bikes members are as follows:

    Patch & Repair a Tube, taught by Mike Sule, Executive Director, Asheville on Bikes

    Repair a Chain, taught by Jonathan Vess, avid cyclist and Asheville on Bikes member

    Gear & Break Tuning, taught by Dean Potter, avid cyclist and Asheville on Bikes member

    Food and beverage provided by Buchi KombuchaRoots Hummus, and The Coffee Pedlar.
    buchi-logo-outlines-in-box-2    roots_logo_for_print-2  Coffee Pedlar

    Event is free and open to the public. Sign-ups will be on a first-come basis.

    This event is held in conjunction with The Future of Fixing, on view at Benchspace Gallery & Workshop September 2, 2016 – January 7, 2017.

    The Future of Fixing was originally created by From-Now-On and adapted and curated by Marilyn Zapf of The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. This project was supported by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

    NCAC



    General and Special: Designer Talk with Ole Jensen

    Wednesday, September 28, 2016 - 6:30 pm | The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

    008 primal pottery project, 2016

    Copenhagen-based ceramist and designer Ole Jensen will provide insights into his process transforming everyday materials into contemporary forms. Jensen will include examples of his own designs that contain both the special and the general.

    This event is free and open to the public. Registration is required.

    Register at: generalandspecial.eventbrite.com

    Artist Statement

    “It is an never-ending challenge to make things that can be perceived as new and special. But it is not always a question of coming up with something completely new and never seen or done before. It can actually be a lot of fun to rediscover. The forgotten, the overlooked, or repressed. As when completely ordinary red clay and primeval forms reveal themselves in a strange way with topical actuality. Or when the ordinary everyday – actions and use – are no longer triviality and down-to-earth function, but assume shape, as a sensual and poetic gesture”

     

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    About Ole Jensen

    Ole Jensen is a ceramist and designer based in Copenhagen, Denmark. He is educated from The Arts and Crafts College in Kolding and the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen. Since 1985, Jensen has taught at several design schools, exhibited his works in museums including Designmuseum Denmark, Victoria and Albert Museum, Indianapolis Museum of Art, among others. He is the recipient of a number of design grants and awards including a Life-long Honorary Grant from the Danish Arts Foundation and has been involved in numerous product design collaborations, such as Royal Copenhagen, Normann Copenhagen and Muuto.

    www.olejensendesign.com

    This event is held in conjunction with The Future of Fixing, on view at Benchspace Gallery & Workshop September 2, 2016 – January 20, 2017.

    The Future of Fixing was originally created by From-Now-On and adapted and curated by Marilyn Zapf of The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

    NCAC



    RECENT NEWS

    Call for Participation: Object as Poet

    Motivated by the writings of longtime Craft Horizons Magazine editor Rose Slivka and artist/poet M.C. Richards, The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design (CCCD) presents a challenge for makers and writers: to create a new collaborative work inspired by The Good Making of Good Things: Craft Horizons Magazine, 1941-1979 in just 11 days.

    Read More...



    VISIT: The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design | 67 Broadway Street, Asheville, NC 28801 | map it | Phone: 828.785.1357 Fax: 828.785.1372 | email us | Gallery hours: Tue - Sat 10-6